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Who Is Michael Osterholm? Bio, Wiki, Wife, Children, Education, Book, COVID-19, Contacts, Twitter

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Michael Osterholm Biography

Michael Osterholm is an American public-health scientist and a biosecurity and infectious-disease expert. He is the Director of The Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy at the University of Minnesota.

He is Regents Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, a professor in the Technological Leadership Institute, College of Science and Engineering, and an adjunct professor in the Medical School, all at the University of Minnesota. He previously served as a Science Envoy for Health Security on behalf of the US Department of State.

Michael Osterholm Credentials

Michael graduated in 1975 from Luther College with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology and Political Science. In 1976 he received a Masters Degree in Environmental Health from the University of Minnesota. In 1978 he received an MPH, Epidemiology from the University of Minnesota.

Michael Osterholm PHD

Osterholm has a PhD in Environmental Health from the University of Minnesota.

Michael Osterholm University of Minnesota

Michael was named to the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center’s Academy of Excellence in Health Research in July 2008. He is the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University.

Michael Osterholm Children

Osterholm is a father to two children; a son, Ryan, who is a lawyer at OFT Food Safety and Injury Lawyers, a firm that represents people sickened in food poisoning outbreaks. His daughter, Erin, is a neonatologist and the Medical Director of the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Michael Osterholm Career

Osterholm began his career at the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) where he served in various roles including as state epidemiologist and Chief of the Acute Disease Epidemiology Section from 1984 to 1999.

In 2001 he became a Special Advisor to then–HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson on issues related to bioterrorism and public health preparedness, a position he held until 2005. In 2002 he was appointed to the interim management team to lead the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), until January, 2003.

In June 2005 he was appointed as the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In July 2008, he was named to the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center’s Academy of Excellence in Health Research. In October 2008, he was appointed to the World Economic Forum Working Group on Pandemics.

Michael Osterholm Honors

Dr. Osterholm has numerous honors which include; an honorary doctorate from Luther College; the Pump Handle Award, CSTE; the Charles C. Shepard Science Award, CDC; the Harvey W. Wiley Medal, FDA; the Squibb Award, IDSA; Distinguished University Teaching Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, UMN; and the Wade Hampton Frost Leadership Award, American Public Health Association. He also has been the recipient of six major research awards from the NIH and the CDC.

Michael Osterholm Book

Michael is the author of 2017 book, Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, in which he details the most pressing infectious disease threats of our day and a nine point strategy on how to address them, with preventing a global flu pandemic at the top of the list.

Michael Osterholm COVID-19

On March 17, 2020 Michael appeared on CNBC where he said that the coronavirus will be here for “many, many months” and the country must decide on a path forward. He said that since there is no vaccine yet the COVID-19 presents a threat to everyone, especially those most at risk.

“We have to continue to consider what it means to die from this virus. It’s a very, very difficult and tragic situation. We also have to have a conversation about how we’re going to live with it. We have to figure that out. Do we envision an America that for the next 18 months will be in complete lockdown?”

He questioned how effective the policies like entire city quarantine and domestic travel restrictions can be really over the long term.

“As soon as China goes back to work and people are on subways and trains, … we are going to see a resurgence of cases back in China.”

He added that a balance should be struck that effectively prevents the spread of the virus while also being sustainable enough to last until a vaccine is developed.

“Our hope is that we suppress it, but we will only be saved really when we have a vaccine.”

Michael Osterholm Twitter

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